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Morgenthau Project

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Morgenthau Holocaust Collections Project

To discover, engage, and share records of American response to the Holocaust

The National Archives holds and provides access to millions of records created or received by the U.S. Government during and after World War II that document Nazi war crimes, wartime refugee issues, and activities and investigations of U.S. Government agencies. Significant Holocaust materials reside at the FDR Presidential Library, and a new discovery project is now underway – helping chart new paths among these remarkable records.

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Digital Scholarship

Enhance digital access and create new tools for citizen-curators

On April 24, 2017, the FDR Library formally launched a curatorial pathfinding initiative named in honor of Henry Morgenthau, Jr., FDR’s friend, advisor, Cabinet member, and head of the War Refugee Board. Morgenthau, whose incredible Papers and Diaries are part of the Library’s archival collection, was a key moral voice for the Roosevelt Administration. 

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There is perhaps no issue from the Roosevelt period that generates as much interest, research and controversy as the Unites States’ response to the Holocaust. The issue is extraordinarily complicated and filled with contradictory perspectives and narratives.

The Morgenthau Project seeks to enhance access to lesser-known archival collections with high research value in Holocaust studies. The Library will digitize thousands of rarely accessed documents, and create new research and engagement tools for citizen-curators to use and share online. These tools will enable citizen-curators to identify significant records, chart pathways among them, and build historical arguments based on those revealing relationships. This platform for digital curation will harness the potential for complex inquiry, and foster public argumentation based on primary source evidence. It will become a powerful new instrument for scholars and the general public to develop a broader, richer understanding of how and why President Roosevelt and the United States government took the actions they did during this period.

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Public Programs

The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum -- with the Jewish Federation of Dutchess County -- will host a documentary film screening and discussion of NUREMBERG: ITS LESSON FOR TODAY [The Schulberg/Waletzky Restoration] with film producer Sandra Schulberg on Wednesday, May 1, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. The screening will be held in the Henry A. Wallace Center at the FDR Presidential Library and Home. This is a Morgenthau Holocaust Collections program in commemoration of Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day).

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Educational Resources

To provide context and background for students and people who are not familiar with the history of the Holocaust, the Morgenthau Project will sponsor Teachable Moment video productions as an educational resource. These videos will draw from the original documentary film NURNBURG, which was produced in 1947 by Pare Lorentz and Stuart Schulberg.  The original film documented the trials of Nazi war criminals, and was funded by the American government.

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Now Hiring: Morgenthau Scholar in Residence

The 2019-2020 Morgenthau Scholar in Residence will assist the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and the Roosevelt Institute with implementation of the Henry Morgenthau Jr. Holocaust Collections Project, a curatorial initiative to discover, engage, and share records of the American response to the Holocaust. This Residency represents a unique and prestigious opportunity to advance scholarly exploration into the Roosevelt Administration’s response to the Holocaust, with the ultimate goal of increasing access to and awareness of key, yet lesser-known primary source evidence. With guidance from the Library Director, an Advisory Committee for the Morgenthau Project, and the Library’s archival staff, the Scholar will: perform in-depth research using Presidential Library holdings; identify and write about new connections in Holocaust documentation; and assist with selection, curation, annotation, and interpretation of key primary sources for new online public resources now under development. The Scholar will also assist in coordinating a planned international conference hosted by the Morgenthau Project in 2021. Candidates with strong research skills and subject matter expertise in Holocaust Studies, Judaic Studies, 20th Century History, and Digital Humanities are strongly encouraged to apply. 

Under the guidance of the Library Director and the Project's Advisory Committee, the core responsibilities of the Scholar include:

Research and Curation

  • Conduct in-depth research on the American response to the Holocaust using primary sources housed at the FDR Library in Hyde Park, New York.
  • Locate and select subject-specific historical materials from across the Library’s archival holdings.
  • Identify and write about new documentary connections in the study of the American response to the Holocaust. Present research to professional groups internally and at external meetings, seminars, conferences.
  • Assist in coordinating a future scholarly conference on new connections in Holocaust documentation.

Digital Humanities

  • Write interpretive content to contextualize selected digital objects and/or aggregate data.   
  • Digitally compile, and/or chart connections among otherwise disparate materials.
  • Consult on user needs, platform possibilities, and visual representations for web-based historical data.
  • Create and maintain metadata for digital objects according to project schematics, and assist with source cataloging or related digital collection development as needed.

 The successful candidate will meet the following requirements for education and experience:

Education 

  • Strong academic performance in History, Holocaust and/or Judaic or Religious Studies.
  • Completed self-directed independent research projects employing original data analysis.
  • Strong academic record and proven outstanding writing and organizational skills.
  • Coursework and dissertation in historiography and/or digital humanities preferred.
  • Docotoral degree or candidacy preferred. 

Experience

  • 1-2 years of research and writing experience preferred (including prior digital curation and/or project management experience).
  • Excellent research and writing skills.
  • An ability to analyze and describe primary source archival material.
  • An ability to aggregate, analyze, and describe historical data.
  • Ability to learn quickly, try new things, and remain flexible.
  • Reading knowledge of Hebrew, Czech, Polish strongly preferred.
  • Passion for fostering public discovery and inspiring new scholarly conversations

This is a non-management, unionized, individual contributor role. Salary range is $50-52,000 depending on qualifications and experience. 

To apply, please send a coverletter, resume or CV, and contact information for three professional or academic references to Lauren Karagianis, Development Associate, at: lkaragianis@rooseveltinstitute.org 

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The Henry Morgenthau, Jr. Holocaust Collections Project is generously funded by the Trustees of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, with major support from the JKW Foundation, Peter S. Kalkow, John Catsimatidis, and the Righteous Persons Foundation.